Costa Rica: pics of stamps – lots of pictures


pics of stamps

Are you that kind of philatelic enthusiast that likes to surf the web looking for pics of stamps from time to time?

Well, here I am to help you! I know that looking at stamps can be hypnotizing. I know that once you start, you’ll leave your computer until you saw the last one.

I’ve been a Costa Rica stamp collector for over 20 years. And i’m pretty sure I never get tired of looking at stamps.

That’s why Estampillascr’s Facebook page has more than 1,500 pics of stamps…Costa Rica stamps. It doesn’t matter what you are looking for, we have plenty! We divided them in several sections, so it would be easier for you to browse them.

You can browse our albums of surface mail stamps, air mail stamps, semi postal stamps, Christmas stamps and proofs. If you like cancellations on stamps, there’s an album too. Also we have albums for postal history and postcards. At last but not least the “errors” albums will take your breath away.

If by any chance you don’t find the stamp you were looking for, don’t panic! Just let me know and I will help you finding it.

Also, you can view the rarest and most expensive Costa Rica stamps from the Frederick R. Mayer collection auction.


Scott 98c: on the Top 3 of the cancel bars

Have you ever been to online auctions and see that they offer the 2 colones from the 1907 issue? They say the’re “used”…cancelled with 5 horizontal bars (cancel bars). Then you think you finally found it for a good price. Hold your horses! Because those stamps are not really used, nor are as expensive as the catalog says!

In March 16th, 1914 a public auction was held to sell all the remainders of the issues of 1901-11. It’s been said that after the auction ended an order was given to overprint all stamps with a pentagram (5 horizontal lines).

There was more quantity of some stamps than other. Resulting that the majority of the stamps with cancel bars have a very low price (way more than what the catalog says). It’s important to know that there are a few, just a few stamps that their value is higher than the catalog price.

One of those stamps is Scott 98c (perf. 14×14). Less than 10 are reported to exist…and here we have it for you!

Scott 98c on the Top 3 of the rarest cancel bars

 


Guanacaste overprints: 2 price changes for Catalog 2018

The Scott Catalog is out now! on the 2018 edition there are some price changes worth mentioning, but for now we’ll focus on the Guanacaste overprints and on 2 stamps in particular.

Guanacaste Overprints Scott 12

First, Scott 12 (G2 overprint type with red ink) that on 2017’s catalog had a price of $1.000, so anyone that bought that stamp -for the catalog price or lower- before the new catalog came out made a great investment. Why? Because it’s price doubled! Yes, you read it right. Now it has a $2.000 price. 100% Y/Y ROI: that’s a wise way of investing your money!

 

Guanacaste Overprints Scott 24

Second, Scott 24 (G3 overprint type with black ink) that also had a catalog price of $1.000 and if it’s true that its price didn’t increase as much as the Scott 12, had a -not bad at all- increase of $500 for a 2018 price of $1.500.


Incredible cover with Scott 111k “VD” instead “UD” coffee promotion

For no reason the issues from the early 1920’s are hard to find used on cover. The most difficult to find on cover is Scott 111J which consist in an overprint for coffee promotion that reads “COMPRE UD. CAFE DE COSTA RICA”. There are only 13 covers known with that stamp.

Scott 111J has an error (position 72): instead of “UD” it reads “VD”. Some people say it was made on purpose some say that it’s a legit error -that will be addressed in another post-.

So, what are the chances that if only 13 covers are known, one of them has the stamp with this error? Low, very low.

The nice thing about the mentioned cover is that it doesn’t have 1 stamp, it has a block of 4! and if that wasn’t amazing enough, it also has the 20 Cts from the Jesus Jimenez issue!

coffee promotion


Scott 83: block of 25 with several varieties and errors

I will never get tired of saying that surcharges and overprints are my favorite. Why? Because there’s more chance there will be varieties and errors…and the 1911 issues are the living proof of it.

Here we have a block of 25 of Scott 83 consisting of positions 56-60, 66-70, 76-80, 86-90 and 96-100 of the base stamp pane and 6-10, 16-20, 26-30, 36-40 and 46-50 of the overprint plate.

The error/variety list is the following:

  1. First roman 1 (position 56 of the base stamp pane and position 6 of the overprint plate).
  2. Double transfer at bse stamp (position 58).
  3. Third roman 1 (position 69 of the base stamp pane and position 19 of the overprint plate).
  4. Second roman 1 (position 100 of the base stamp pane and position 50 of the overprint plate).

varieties and errors


Scott 84c With Overprint on Selvage

Just when everything seems calm and you think there’s nothing that can make your day…a stamp like this appears. Surprise!

Let’s be fair, it’s not easy to find a Scott 84c (Perf. 14×14) new with gum. Now, add a shifted printing and by some kind of a miracle one overprint falls on the selvage…SCORE!

Fig.1

 

 


Scott 82 Vertical Pair Imperforated Between

We have written about this stamp before, but not for an impressive error as this one. It consists in a vertical pair imperforated horizontally. The most interesting fact is that this error passed two printing inspections without being noticed or just ignored…thank God!

Fig.1


Scott 82a “Habilitada” instead of “Habilitado”

The stamp Scott 82 consist in the 5 céntimos from the 1907 issue overprinted “Habilitado 1911”. It’s true there are plenty of varieties/errors in this issue, but there are just a few that really catch philatelist’s eye.

Scott 82a is one of those. Instead of reading “Habilitado 1911” it reads “Habilitada 1911″. It’s hard to think this is a common mistake since the “a” and the “o” used in this overprint don’t look alike. In my opinion, this is the result of someone’s will to mess with the plate or maybe, just maybe the printers ran out of “o”.

In the end -the philatelic end- it doesn’t matter. Why? Because it’s a really nice error!

4C812D3F85C34549919E6DCB7E76C113
Click image to enlarge


Scott 83 with double “Braulio Carrillo” transfer

In September 29th, 1907 a new stamp issue started circulating -with really similar designs as Costa Rica’s previous issue – generating what I like the most: possibilities of new varieties/errors.

The 10 centimos stamp depicting Braulio Carrillo has one of those beautiful errors: a clear double transfer where it reads “Braulio Carrillo”. For some people this error is often ignored, but for those who know a little of Costa Rica’s philatelic history, this is a must.

Located in the 58th position of a 100 stamps pane, this is considered one of the top errors in the 1907 issue.

Even nicer is to find this error on the Scott 83 stamp. Some of the 1907 issue values were overprinted to be used in 1911, being the 10 centimos one of those.

Below you can see a really nice example of this error…enjoy!

54EC3D94E6724D019A0A23F5C4436EF6
Click for a larger image.