Costa Rica: pics of stamps – lots of pictures


pics of stamps

Are you that kind of philatelic enthusiast that likes to surf the web looking for pics of stamps from time to time?

Well, here I am to help you! I know that looking at stamps can be hypnotizing. I know that once you start, you’ll leave your computer until you saw the last one.

I’ve been a Costa Rica stamp collector for over 20 years. And i’m pretty sure I never get tired of looking at stamps.

That’s why Estampillascr’s Facebook page has more than 1,500 pics of stamps…Costa Rica stamps. It doesn’t matter what you are looking for, we have plenty! We divided them in several sections, so it would be easier for you to browse them.

You can browse our albums of surface mail stamps, air mail stamps, semi postal stamps, Christmas stamps and proofs. If you like cancellations on stamps, there’s an album too. Also we have albums for postal history and postcards. At last but not least the “errors” albums will take your breath away.

If by any chance you don’t find the stamp you were looking for, don’t panic! Just let me know and I will help you finding it.

Also, you can view the rarest and most expensive Costa Rica stamps from the Frederick R. Mayer collection auction.


Scott 98 Perf. 14×14, block of 6 with inverted surcharge and “Correos” inverted

Have you ever watched the movie Inception? A dream inside a dream…

We’ll, here you can see an inverted surcharge inception: an inverted “Correos” in a block of 6 with inverted surcharge. Sounds weird, I know, but let me explain it:
In this issue there are stamps with inverted surcharge because the pane was upside down when the plate came down. Also there are stamps with only the “Correos” inverted because it happened in just one position in the plate (position 46).
This block of 6 has 3 characteristics that make it special and fairly rare:

  1. It has the less common perforation for this stamp (14×14).
  2. The surcharges in this block are inverted.
  3. And last and most important is that the inverted “Correos” error is present. As you can see in the position 3 of this block, the inverted “Correos” error inside the inverted surcharge looks as if it wasn’t inverted.

Is it genuine? Yes, of course!
Just look at the stain between the “o” and the “r” of the inverted “Correos”.
Beautiful!


Roman 1: Scott 84a overprint on red ink

Once again the beautiful 1911 issue. Overprints fully loaded of errors and varieties, so interesting, so nice. This time we’ll talk about the roman 1, but on the red ink (Scott 84a).

It’s true that these can be found on stamps Scott 82 and 83 (black ink), the most interesting are the ones that can be found on red ink because they are harder to get. There is not an exact number of printed stamps for each one (Scott 82, 83 and 84), but there’s no doubt that the ones with red ink are more scarce.

The roman 1 can be found in 3 the 3 positions of “1911”:

  • “I911” in positions 6 and 21.
  • “19I1” in position 50
  • “191I” in position 19

Scott 84a pair with first roman 1

Scott 84a pair with second roman 1


Scott 94b a “hard to find-underated” stamp

The 1911 issue has many highlights, being Scott 94b one of them. Why, let’s do some math:

According to the decree #242 of December 6th, 1911 only 1,500 stamps of Scott 94 (including the 14×14 stamps) where issued. now, The inverted correos happens 2 times per pane (of 100). 1,500/100= 15×2= 30. The math doesn’t end there because at least 2 panes where 14×14. So, 4 stamps are 94c (correos inverted, but perforation 14×14). The final math would be 30 (correos inverted stamps) – 4 (correos inverted 14×14)= 26 stamps Scott 94b.

Even though, only 26 copies of Scott 94b were made -and there are no records how many remain- collectors tend to pass these rarities by. Maybe because 1911 is not “classic” material, or just maybe they don’t realize how difficult is this stamp.

Scott 94b


Scott 83: block of 25 with several varieties and errors

I will never get tired of saying that surcharges and overprints are my favorite. Why? Because there’s more chance there will be varieties and errors…and the 1911 issues are the living proof of it.

Here we have a block of 25 of Scott 83 consisting of positions 56-60, 66-70, 76-80, 86-90 and 96-100 of the base stamp pane and 6-10, 16-20, 26-30, 36-40 and 46-50 of the overprint plate.

The error/variety list is the following:

  1. First roman 1 (position 56 of the base stamp pane and position 6 of the overprint plate).
  2. Double transfer at bse stamp (position 58).
  3. Third roman 1 (position 69 of the base stamp pane and position 19 of the overprint plate).
  4. Second roman 1 (position 100 of the base stamp pane and position 50 of the overprint plate).

varieties and errors


Scott 94c: One of the rarest Costa Rica Stamps

When I try to think about the rarest Costa Rica stamps, a few come quickly to my mind: the 1901 2 Cts inverted center, the 1907 inverted centres and some Guanacaste overprints…wait! there’s another extremely rare, almost impossible to find (not fake) jewel: Scott 94c.

Let’s start fresh: the Scott 94 itself it’s not easy to find. It’s true you can go to eBay and find a lot of those…99.9% are fakes. Then finding a legit copy with the correos inverted will cost you $2000 according to catalog price. Now, add 14×14 perforation to the equation…are you nuts? No, not at all…it exist…i bought it 🙂

Can it get any better? yes, of course! It’s a beautiful pair!!!

How do i know it’s not a fake? Easy measures fit and the most important and easy characteristic: there’s an ink stain between the “o” and “r” of “Correos”.

Costa Rica Scott 94c


Scott 84c With Overprint on Selvage

Just when everything seems calm and you think there’s nothing that can make your day…a stamp like this appears. Surprise!

Let’s be fair, it’s not easy to find a Scott 84c (Perf. 14×14) new with gum. Now, add a shifted printing and by some kind of a miracle one overprint falls on the selvage…SCORE!

Fig.1

 

 


Scott 82 Vertical Pair Imperforated Between

We have written about this stamp before, but not for an impressive error as this one. It consists in a vertical pair imperforated horizontally. The most interesting fact is that this error passed two printing inspections without being noticed or just ignored…thank God!

Fig.1


Scott 82a “Habilitada” instead of “Habilitado”

The stamp Scott 82 consist in the 5 céntimos from the 1907 issue overprinted “Habilitado 1911”. It’s true there are plenty of varieties/errors in this issue, but there are just a few that really catch philatelist’s eye.

Scott 82a is one of those. Instead of reading “Habilitado 1911” it reads “Habilitada 1911″. It’s hard to think this is a common mistake since the “a” and the “o” used in this overprint don’t look alike. In my opinion, this is the result of someone’s will to mess with the plate or maybe, just maybe the printers ran out of “o”.

In the end -the philatelic end- it doesn’t matter. Why? Because it’s a really nice error!

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Click image to enlarge


Scott 83 with double “Braulio Carrillo” transfer

In September 29th, 1907 a new stamp issue started circulating -with really similar designs as Costa Rica’s previous issue – generating what I like the most: possibilities of new varieties/errors.

The 10 centimos stamp depicting Braulio Carrillo has one of those beautiful errors: a clear double transfer where it reads “Braulio Carrillo”. For some people this error is often ignored, but for those who know a little of Costa Rica’s philatelic history, this is a must.

Located in the 58th position of a 100 stamps pane, this is considered one of the top errors in the 1907 issue.

Even nicer is to find this error on the Scott 83 stamp. Some of the 1907 issue values were overprinted to be used in 1911, being the 10 centimos one of those.

Below you can see a really nice example of this error…enjoy!

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Click for a larger image.