Roman 1: Scott 84a overprint on red ink

Once again the beautiful 1911 issue. Overprints fully loaded of errors and varieties, so interesting, so nice. This time we’ll talk about the roman 1, but on the red ink (Scott 84a).

It’s true that these can be found on stamps Scott 82 and 83 (black ink), the most interesting are the ones that can be found on red ink because they are harder to get. There is not an exact number of printed stamps for each one (Scott 82, 83 and 84), but there’s no doubt that the ones with red ink are more scarce.

The roman 1 can be found in 3 the 3 positions of “1911”:

  • “I911” in positions 6 and 21.
  • “19I1” in position 50
  • “191I” in position 19

Scott 84a pair with first roman 1

Scott 84a pair with second roman 1


1910’s 10 Cts with folded paper

The 1910 issue is known for being a very “clean” issue. There are not known design errors in the more than 40,000,000 stamps that were printed. Fortunately, errors like folded paper are known to happen in this issue.

But there were errors in the printing process -and not many-. Some imperforated stamps are known, but the highlights are the folded paper errors when the stamps were being printed.

Here we have an example of the 10 Cts. What happened is that the paper was folded when printing the stamps and when the paper was unfolded, a part of the stamp didn’t have ink on it.

10 Cts with folded paper


Scott 49a, imperforated pair: a real gem!

This is the first of a series of posts describing the imperforated pairs of the late XIX and early XX century.

This time, we have an incredible vertical pair imperforated in between of the 20 Cts from the 1901 issue.

It´s being said that this error happened between 2 rows only. So, this means that only 10 of these happened.

Scott 49a Imperforated Pair

Now, do you think that errors that only 10 exist are worth $1.000? Of course not! In my opinion the Scott catalog is under rating many Costa Rican stamps. A great example are the imperforated pairs from the late 1800’s through the early 1900’s. Fortunately, the market is taking action and setting the right prices.


Scott 98c: on the Top 3 of the cancel bars

Have you ever been to online auctions and see that they offer the 2 colones from the 1907 issue? They say the’re “used”…cancelled with 5 horizontal bars (cancel bars). Then you think you finally found it for a good price. Hold your horses! Because those stamps are not really used, nor are as expensive as the catalog says!

In March 16th, 1914 a public auction was held to sell all the remainders of the issues of 1901-11. It’s been said that after the auction ended an order was given to overprint all stamps with a pentagram (5 horizontal lines).

There was more quantity of some stamps than other. Resulting that the majority of the stamps with cancel bars have a very low price (way more than what the catalog says). It’s important to know that there are a few, just a few stamps that their value is higher than the catalog price.

One of those stamps is Scott 98c (perf. 14×14). Less than 10 are reported to exist…and here we have it for you!

Scott 98c on the Top 3 of the rarest cancel bars

 


Guanacaste overprints: 2 price changes for Catalog 2018

The Scott Catalog is out now! on the 2018 edition there are some price changes worth mentioning, but for now we’ll focus on the Guanacaste overprints and on 2 stamps in particular.

Guanacaste Overprints Scott 12

First, Scott 12 (G2 overprint type with red ink) that on 2017’s catalog had a price of $1.000, so anyone that bought that stamp -for the catalog price or lower- before the new catalog came out made a great investment. Why? Because it’s price doubled! Yes, you read it right. Now it has a $2.000 price. 100% Y/Y ROI: that’s a wise way of investing your money!

 

Guanacaste Overprints Scott 24

Second, Scott 24 (G3 overprint type with black ink) that also had a catalog price of $1.000 and if it’s true that its price didn’t increase as much as the Scott 12, had a -not bad at all- increase of $500 for a 2018 price of $1.500.